Thursday, March 3, 2022

Disclosure and Beyond: Restructuring the U.S. Equity Markets

BRIEFING GUIDE to the SEC's Aggressive Agenda to Head off the Next "Big Squeeze"

Author: David Schwartz J.D. CPA

On Friday, February 25, 2022, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) proposed its latest round of GameStop rule proposals. In addition to enhanced public disclosures of short sales by institutional investors, the Commission announced a 30-day extension of the comment period on its sweeping securities lending disclosure proposal, Rule 10c-1, and technical amendments to the "consolidated audit tape" regulations. These separate, but related, disclosure proposals may well be the start of a much broader and far-ranging regulatory response to the kind of market disruptions epitomized by the Gamestop event.  

 

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Saturday, January 22, 2022

Lenders and Borrowers Sound off on the SEC's Disclosure Proposal

Giving the SEC an Earful and Sounding the Alarm

Author: David Schwartz J.D. CPA

The Securities and Exchange Commission's (SEC) securities lending disclosure proposal has drawn sharp rebuke from both securities lenders and borrowers. Lending principals criticized the proposal on everything from cost, lack of clarity, and overbroad scope to the rule's general inequity. They also pointed out a host of potential unintended consequences that could work against the very transparency the rule proposal was intended to foster. 

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Monday, December 13, 2021

“Wisely and Slow; They Stumble that Run Fast.”

Finding a Better Value Proposition for the SEC's Sec Lending Disclosure Rule

Author: David Schwartz J.D. CPA

The SEC has proposed a radical and potentially very costly reporting regime for securities finance transactions to increase transparency "to brokers, dealers, and investors."  While there is no requirement for the Commission to discuss or examine the economic effects of regulatory alternatives, in this case, they have included some alternatives it could consider to the reporting structure they propose, presumably to focus potential commenters on specific ideas they want explored. The Commission has seemingly outsourced the economic analysis of its suggested alternatives to industry commenters. Also, by doing so, the Commission has hinted it is interested in hearing about well-supported alternatives, and may even be inviting counter-proposals. 

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Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Who Bears the Cost of the SEC's Securities Lending Disclosure Proposal?

The Winners and Losers in Mandatory Transparency

Author: David Schwartz J.D. CPA

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) recently proposed a new reporting regime to increase transparency and efficiency in the securities-lending market. The proposal is a sweeping change and a somewhat novel approach to bringing securities lending out of the dark. While the merits of the proposal's approach will no doubt be thoroughly scrutinized and debated, so should its cost and who will bear that cost. While the potential benefits would seem to flow to all participants in the securities lending markets, the SEC's choice to place the reporting burden on lenders and their agents also burdens those loan participants (lenders particularly) with nearly the entire cost of compliance. 

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Sunday, November 21, 2021

SEC Proposes Sweeping Securities Lending Disclosure Rules

Bringing Securities Lending Out of the Dark.

Author: David Schwartz J.D. CPA

On November 18, 2021, the Securities and Exchange Commission proposed broad disclosure rules intended to "provide transparency in the securities lending market." As directed by the Dodd-Frank Act, the Commission proposed these rules to (1) supplement publicly available information, (2) close data gaps in the securities lending market, (3) minimize information asymmetries between market participants, and (5) provide market participants with access to pricing and other material information.

Further, the data elements proposed to be collected are intended to provide regulators with the information necessary to perform effective market surveillance. "This proposal would bring securities lending out of the dark," according to SEC Chair Gary Gensler. 

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Number of views (2020)
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